All About The PFAS Chemical And Drinking Water

Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of man-made chemicals found in a wide range of consumer and commercial items. Some forms of PFAS have been demonstrated to build in the environment and our bodies because they are difficult to break down.

Environmental Working Group says exposure to PFAS can cause major health problems, including cancer, liver problems, and thyroid issues. Exposure has been linked with damaging the immune system and reproductive organs.

PFAS are often found in things like firefighting foam and food packaging. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a legal limit for PFAS in drinking water at 70 parts per trillion. However, many public water systems have detected levels of PFAS up to 1,000 parts per trillion. To get more information about the PFAS in drinking water visit https://watercontaminationlawsuits.com/pfas-drinking-water.asp.

What Are PFAS Chemicals and Why Do They Matter to You? - Conservation Law Foundation

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As of now, there is no safe level of PFAS exposure for humans. EWG recommends that people avoid eating meat and seafood that have high levels of PFAS contamination. You can also reduce your exposure by avoiding items made with PFAS-containing materials and washing your food and dishes before you eat them.

How did humans come into contact with PFAS?

PFAS have been found in drinking water in many parts of the United States. The levels of PFAS found in water can be high enough to cause health concerns, especially for people who drink large amounts of water each day. There is no safe level of PFAS exposure, and people should avoid drinking water with high levels of these compounds.

How do I know if my water contains PFAS?

There is no way to test for PFAS in water without also testing for other contaminants. However, many public water systems are working to reduce or eliminate exposure to these chemicals through management practices such as treating wastewater before it is discharged into waterways. In some cases, public water systems have replaced or eliminated products that contain PFAS.