How to use a foam roller to treat plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is easily the most frequent musculoskeletal disorder seen by foot doctors. It is an inflammatory reaction and also degeneration with the plantar fascia that is a long and strong ligament that spans across the mid-foot (arch) of the foot. The common indications are pain below the heel bone and worse pain on getting up from rest, mainly in the early morning after a night’s sleep. Most things that adds to the strain on the arch of the feet are going to overburden the plantar fascia. For example weight problems, being active, standing on your feet throughout the day and structural problems that affect the alignment of the feet. There are many different therapies which can be appropriate for plantar fasciitis, with the most beneficial ones being the ones that lessen the stress added to the long plantar ligament.

We have seen plenty of interest on the usage of foam rollers to treat orthopedic issues lately, along with the query gets asked frequently as to if we are able to use a foam roller for plantar fasciitis?

It is common to see information given to roll the foot forward and backward over a tennis ball on the ground and that this will help the this condition. This would have a similar affect as to what a foam roller would have. No research has revealed this will be helpful, even though plenty of people do make use of it. With that said, you can find a lot of health professionals that would urge against doing it. It is not necessarily bad, but they believe it simply doesn't do a lot of good in comparison to the anything else that can be used and are quite possibly far better. One idea to take into account is always that whenever we hurt ourselves, rubbing the region with the discomfort usually generally seems to feel a lot better. That will not suggest the rubbing really fixes the problem, it just makes it feel a little improved. This is perhaps exactly why so many health care professionals are cynical regarding advocating self-massage or foam rolling for the plantar fasciitis.

Some new research has been lately released on the usage of a foam roller for plantar fasciitis. This was a randomized controlled study looking at using a foam roller to stretching. Usually in clinical practice it is not a question of opting to use one solution or another like in this clinical study. A number of treatment options tend to be used together in combination, so the medical study is almost artificial. Having said that, the study did demonstrate that each helped equally or the foam roller may be a slightly bit superior, so using the foam roller to massage the arch part of the feet for people that have heel pain certainly is worth it.

Based on the above it probably is advisable to make use of something such as the foam roller. There are particular solutions, much like the Pediroller, which have been made to roll under the arch of the foot. They may not fix heel pain, however based on the anecdotes and this one piece of research, it may certainly make it feel a lot better at the very least. This is sufficient reason to be able to give it a try.

How to manage dry cracked skin on your heels

Cracks in the skin round the heel is usually both embarrassing and painful. This problem is caused by the thick or dry skin, on and round the edges of the heels. The skin on your feet will likely be more dry and dehydrated in comparison to the skin in other places on the rest of the body most likely as there are no sebaceous glands in the thicker epidermis on the bottom of the feet. Due to this, the skin around the heels can lose suppleness and elasticity because of that loss of moisture. As a result of the loads of weightbearing, that dry skin will start to crack and it can result in unsightly, painful cracked heels which can occasionally bleed. There are a number of factors which raise the risk for the cracked heels such as higher loads, greater weight, inappropriate shoes (particularly footwear that are open at the back), genetics, unhygienic problems and poor self-care, as well as nutritional inadequacies.

To prevent cracked heels, always attempt to wear properly fitted enclosed footwear that enable the feet to breathe and get away from shoes that are open at the back. It is important to remain well hydrated by consuming at least two litres of water per day as that can help. Exfoliate the skin on a regular basis and moisturise daily with a decent ointment. If it is more severe, this probably should be done twice daily at first. There are many suggestions that omega-3 and zinc dietary supplements could help (however they really do need to be used with all the other treatment options and not on there own). It will also help to avoid too much exposure of the foot to water or moist conditions. It is necessary that you wash your feet with tepid to warm water rather than hot water. If these kinds of strategies tend not to help, then see a experienced podiatrist. They can get rid of the thicker hard skin and provide additional suggestions about how you can self treat.